Monday, May 31, 2010

007 - Rikkensbloggen - Woofing weekend med Skattungbyn

Det glada gardet från Skattungbyn med förstärkning av Faluns nya certifierade permakulturist anlände till Rikkenstorp för att hjälpa till och även lära sig under helg! Strålande väder växlade till hagelskurar och arbete mot folköl i bastun, god mat och härliga tider! Stort tack för en underbar helg!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NWvGoEeY6OM&feature=youtube_gdat

Credit: thepermatechchannel

Saturday, May 29, 2010

Jean Pain - Compost Based Bio-Energy System - Pt. 2

www.permacultureplanet.com - Jean Pain (1930 - 1981) was a French innovator who developed a compost based bioenergy system that produced 100% of his energy needs. He heated water to 60 degrees celsius at a rate of 4 litres a minute which he used for washing and heating. He also distilled enough methane to run an electricity generator, cooking elements, and power his truck. This method of creating usable energy from composting materials has come to be known as Jean Pain Composting, or the Jean Pain Method.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aXKvJn8HNoA&feature=youtube_gdat

Credit: permascience

Jean Pain - Compost Based Bio-Energy System - Pt. 1

www.permacultureplanet.com - Jean Pain (1930 - 1981) was a French innovator who developed a compost based bioenergy system that produced 100% of his energy needs. He heated water to 60 degrees celsius at a rate of 4 litres a minute which he used for washing and heating. He also distilled enough methane to run an electricity generator, cooking elements, and power his truck. This method of creating usable energy from composting materials has come to be known as Jean Pain Composting, or the Jean Pain Method.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a4jrskze_UU&feature=youtube_gdat

Credit: permascience

Wednesday, May 19, 2010

Urban Worm Farm Solution - Step by Step Setup

After discovering our family compost bin was in a dangerously anaerobic state I decided a worm farm would be a much more suitable and productive way to deal with organic waste from the kitchen. Dont get me wrong, when done right compost is the best option out there but I cant see my family producing enough waste in one go to make a pile large enough to really get the beneficial bacteria dominating, plus that process takes skill and dedication. Basically when I want to make a compost heap for the garden I will make it separately and add worm castings and juice to enrich it, but day to day the worms are a better solution to control scraps. The benefits of a worm farm are many, my main reasons were: - Compact, making it perfect in an urban setting - Low Maintenance - Low energy input for high quality output - Regular worm juice for watering - High quality Castings (worm poo) to grow great vegetables in In this video I follow the process to set it up and get started. This video is produced by The Permaculture Research Institute of Australia (PRI) For more information on worm farms and all things Permaculture please visit www.permaculture.org.au

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PGt1NzvEpCY&feature=youtube_gdat

Credit: permaculturenews

Monday, May 10, 2010

CERES Environment Park visit

Here I visit CERES in Brunswick, Melbourne while on a mission for seeds and compost worms. www.ceres.org.au It's a great place with many aspects of sustainability on display. I was luck enough to chat to Matt about what happens in propagation and also Greg from the CERES Cafe. This video is produced by The Permaculture Research Institute Australia (PRI) For more information on Permaculture please visit www.permaculture.org.au ABOUT CERES (Taken from http CERES (the Centre for Education and Research in Environmental Strategies, pronounced series) is an internationally recognised model of a sustainable society located in Melbourne, Australia. CERES shares its name with the Roman Goddess for agriculture. CERES is located on 4.5 hectares (10 acres) on the banks of the Merri Creek, in East Brunswick, close to the centre of Melbourne. CERES runs on renewable energy, conserves and recycles its water and waste, grows organic food; and teaches diverse audiences about more just and environmentally friendly ways of living. What makes the CERES concept particularly compelling is that sustainability initiatives are located in a participatory social setting which, over time, has created a village-like environment, made up of a melting pot of different audiences.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y0OjqMpwTAs&feature=youtube_gdat

Credit: permaculturenews

Friday, May 7, 2010

Very Edible Gardens Urban Kindergarten Installation

In this video I visit Dan and Adam from Very Edible Gardens in Melbourne. They're doing a Permaculture installation at a kindergarten that will be maintained by the children daily, teaching them all about where food comes from. The garden will also supply their commercial kitchen which feeds over 100 children from the 3 kindergartens in the region. This video is produced by The Permaculture Research Institute Australia (PRI) For more information on Permaculture please visit www.permaculture.org.au

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IsnphpAeqSA&feature=youtube_gdat

Credit: permaculturenews